Aquatic Plants for Freshwater Aquariums

Most common indoor plants used for water purification in aquariums:
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The point is: don’t assume that just because a plant is displayed fully submerged in water that its a true-aquatic suitable for aquariums. Ask the clerk to confirm, and read labels carefully.
Glossary of aquatic science terms used in ichthyology and aquarium circles for freshwater and marine animals, corals and plants
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If you would like , carpet plants are ideal. Water Wisteria, Java Moss, and Lilaeopsis are suitable species for covering the bottom of the aquarium. Glossary of aquatic science terms used in ichthyology and aquarium circles for freshwater and marine animals, corals and plants
Photo provided by FlickrGlossary of aquatic science terms used in ichthyology and aquarium circles for freshwater and marine animals, corals and plants
Photo provided by FlickrGlossary of aquatic science terms used in ichthyology and aquarium circles for freshwater and marine animals, corals and plants
Photo provided by Flickr
As stated above floating plants have many benefits for your fish and aquarium. They help keep tabs on harmful chemicals in the water and assist in reducing nitrate levels. Water changes will still need to be done, but plants will still give that little extra help.Carpet aquarium plants or foreground aquarium plants are these species of aquatic plants which cover the bottom of your water tank. They are the most important plants in aquascaping. Carpet plants are shorter than other plants and successfully fill the front of your aquarium. Lilaeopsis, Micro Sword, Micranthenum ,Pogestemon, Lobelia mini, Hemianthus thalicroides Cuba, Dwarf Baby Tears, or Eleocharis parvula, Dwarf spikerush, Eleocharis accicularis, Dwarf hairgrass, Hemianthus micranth...Due to the size of the water lettuce its best suited for slightly larger aquariums, I'd say at least 100 liters - roughly depending on length and/or height. But again it's a beautiful plant that once established in an aquarium completes the look and gives a stunning view.Similar advances in technology and propagation, which have made the marine aquarium hobby easier, have also been developed for the live plant aquarist. With such innovation making live plant care easier today, the hobbyist must still have the proper understanding and equipment to be successful. Common ground for any aquarists is to keep a watchful eye on aquarium water conditions, feeding, lighting, and the growth and death of the animals and plants.Increased environmental awareness, and the push to find a new challenge or dimension to freshwater aquarists has rejuvenated the interest in keeping live plants in the aquarium. Commonly referred to as “Dutch Aquarium", this European concept is beginning to catch on in the U.S. For years, Europeans have kept indoor “water gardens” (aquariums) loaded with live plants, and displaying only a few fish to accent their garden. This approach is opposite from the traditional fish keeper who considered fish the primary attraction in the aquarium. It can be argued that a true fish keeper would be hard pressed to create a biologically-balanced ecosystem more beautiful than one that is well planted with live vegetation.Nutrients
Nitrates, found in fertilizers, are another substance plants use in photosynthesis. A working biological filtration system produces nitrates as a result of the nitrogen cycle (see “New Tank Water Conditions” tip sheet). Aquarium plants actually complete the nitrogen cycle by eliminating nitrates from the water. Consequently, live plants generally do not fare well in newly established aquarium conditions where nitrate levels are low. An alternative for new tanks is to supplement with a fertilizer containing nitrates.