GLENN: — fish swimming in the streets of Honolulu and Miami?

 He saw the fish while swimming off the north coast of New South Wales in Australia.
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All the fish are swimming in the water (with hands together, swish hands back and forth like a darting fish)
Swimming in the water
Swimming in the water
All the fish are swimming in the water (swimming motions with arms)
Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble...SPLASH! (make hands larger and larger and big clap to SPLASH)

All the ducks are quacking in the water (quack hands like duck bills)
Quacking in the water
Quacking in the water
All the ducks are quacking in the water (doggy paddle motion with hands)
Bubble, bubble, bubble, bubble...SPLASH!
Fish swimming performance has been classified into three distinct categories:
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The meshing techniques mentioned above allowed the team to accurately study the effects of fish motion on the fluid environment, including wake creation. When a solid such as a fish moves in a fluid environment, it can create a wake, or an area of disturbed flow, behind itself. The research team used COMSOL Multiphysics in this case to observe and analyze the wake pattern and vortices generated by carangiform swimming. They found that every stroke of the fish’s tail released vortices and that the mutual distance between the cores of the vortices didn’t change. this video is just a video that shows swimming fish
Photo provided by FlickrFish kinematics: swimming movements stride by stride
Photo provided by FlickrSwimming dynamics: exchange of forces between fish and water
Photo provided by Flickr
The fish kick, if done properly, is the fastest way for a human to swim. The technique requires a swimmer to lie sideways and wiggle her body in a fluid motion that mimics that of a minnow or an eel. At the 2000 Olympics, American swimmer Misty Hyman , beating out two heavily favored Australian swimmers.The fish kick is the of the pool, a rarely seen and fascinating specimen. It emerged in Sunday night's 4-by-100 men's freestyle relay, when the United States' Ryan Held used the kick on his turn in the third leg of the race. But Held's fish kick was an unusual sight in Rio. If it's the fastest kick in the world, why don't more swimmers do it?When a fish swims in water, muscle contraction, controlled by the nervous system, interacts with the body tissues and the surrounding fluid to yield the observed movement pattern of the body. A continuous dynamic beam model describing the bending moment balance on the body for such an interaction during swimming has been established. In the model a linear visco-elastic assumption is made for the passive behaviour of internal tissues, skin and backbone, and the unsteady fluid force acting on the swimming body is calculated by the 3D waving plate theory. The body bending moment distribution due to the various components, in isolation and acting together, is analysed. The analysis is based on the saithe (Pollachius virens), a carangiform swimmer. The fluid reaction needs a bending moment of increasing amplitude towards the tail and near-standing wave behaviour on the rear-half of the body. The inertial movement of the fish results from a wave of bending moment with increasing amplitude along the body and a higher propagation speed than that of body bending. In particular, the fluid reaction, mainly designed for propulsion, can provide a considerable force to balance the local momentum change of the body and thereby reduce the power required from the muscle. The wave of passive visco-elastic bending moment, with an amplitude distribution peaking a little before the mid-point of the fish, travels with a speed close to that of body bending. The calculated muscle bending moment from the whole dynamic system has a wave speed almost the same as that observed for EMG-onset and a starting instant close to that of muscle activation, suggesting a consistent matching between the muscle activation pattern and the dynamic response of the system in steady swimming. A faster wave of muscle activation, with a variable phase relation between the strain and activation cycle, appears to be designed to fit the fluid reaction and, to a lesser extent, the body inertia, and is limited by the passive internal tissues. Higher active stress is required from caudal muscle, as predicted from experimental studies on fish muscle. In general, the active force development by muscle does not coincide with the propulsive force generation on the tail. The stiffer backbone may play a role in transmitting force and deformation to maintain and adjust the movement of the body and tail in water.A second problem: The fish kick is supremely difficult to master. In addition to keeping their bodies rotated just so, swimmers must worry about veering away from the center of their lanes, since it’s pretty much impossible to keep your eye on the lane markings when you’re on your side.