South American fish tank - YouTube

Wild Wood Roots Fish Tank (Central and South American Cichlids ) - YouTube
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South American Cichlids are naturally aggressive fish. When placed in the confines of an aquarium you may see an increase in aggressive behavior. This is especially true if the aquarium is too small, and if there is inadequate places for a tank mate to avoid an aggressor. Planning ahead can help avoid problems of predation and aggressive incompatibility.
Wild Wood Roots Fish Tank (Central and South American Cichlids ) - YouTube
Photo provided by Flickr
Most Cichlid lovers (and even fish forums and webistes) would say that African and South American Cichlids should never be housed in the same tank, and moreso with other species of fish that are deemed "not safe" to be around these guys. Among the reasons for this are water parameters, substrate, aggression (the number one reason I think), and food source. Well, I don't disagree with those, in fact I agree but I wanted to experiment, so I did it. not because I am insensitive to my little friends, but I do think that there is a chance that it would work if done in a different way. I meant no harm to them. I was just thinking maybe there is a chance they would get along (like us humans at work, we might not like some people, but we don't need to like each other to be able to work together). South American fish tank
Photo provided by FlickrSouth American Fish Tank - YouTube
Photo provided by FlickrSouth American 210 gallon fish tank
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Three weeks after setting up my new Trofis Colisa 120 tank and I've welcomed 8 new Black Phantom Tetra into my tank. Watch them as they feed on live artemia while the men flare their fins to show off their beauty. I think I'll probably get 7 more so that the total will be 7 male and 8 female tetras. Easy to tell the difference between them by the way. Males are black with black fins and the females have a more copper like colour on their body and red in their pelvic fins.

Meanwhile the Otocinclus carelessly do what they do best, find algae and eat it. As you can see in some close up shots there's quite a bit of it. I always end up with algae when I start up a new aquarium but it's slowly being pushed back already so I am confident most will be gone in a few weeks time.

I was thinking about getting a handful of rainbowfish or puntius denisonii but I think I'll just stick to South America. So far all my fish can be found in Brazil so I think I'll just buy six Bleeding Heart tetra instead. They get to be a decent size too.

Another awesome thing that happened is that my cute Ramirezi couple show a lot more confidence now that there is a nice school of fish swiming over their heads. They've been coming up from the bottom a lot more than before!

I'm also thinking about getting another couple of Apistogramma Viejita but I am still not sure if a 120cm tank is big enough for two types of dwarf cichlids.

Plant wise I'm not happy with most of the Anubias and will probably try to replace 75% of them and just keep a few. I don't think I'll ever have a fishtank with 100% South American plants simply because I love my cryptos too much. Such awesome plants.This list barely scratches the surface of fantastic catfish from South America and doesn’t include some real characters like the beautiful little driftwood catfish (Tatia perugiae) and the enormous but gentle mother-of-snails catfish (Oxydoras niger). What should be clear is that South American catfish offer something for everyone, and few community tanks won’t be improved through the addition of a carefully chosen South American catfish. AFI The blue-eyed panaque is aggressive and territorial toward their own kind and other plecos, but they are otherwise peaceful, ignoring even tiny tetras and livebearer fry. Optimal diet is a matter of debate, with some evidence suggesting that they consume and digest wood alongside other plant material and small invertebrates. Certainly, their spoon-shaped teeth are well-adapted for rasping away at decaying wood. Under aquarium conditions, they actually seem to be quite adaptable, and while bogwood must be provided (as part of their diet), they will do well on a mix of algae wafers, sweet potato, zucchini, cooked peas and lettuce leaves. Meaty foods are enjoyed, but they should be weekly treats rather than staple foods.
Maximum length is more than a foot, which is a bit bigger than the average royal panaque. Be aware that all Panaque species destroy plants, even plants like Anubias, which is otherwise left alone by herbivorous fish. They also produce vast amounts of feces, so a spacious, heavily filtered aquarium is absolutely essential. A 75-gallon tank would barely be adequate; this is a catfish for unplanted tanks upwards of 100 gallons in size.This list barely scratches the surface of fantastic catfish from South America and doesn’t include some real characters like the beautiful little driftwood catfish (Tatia perugiae) and the enormous but gentle mother-of-snails catfish (Oxydoras niger). What should be clear is that South American catfish offer something for everyone, and few community tanks won’t be improved through the addition of a carefully chosen South American catfish. AFI Neale Monks studied zoology at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland and received a Ph.D. in paleontology at Imperial College, University of London. He worked as a marine biologist and now writes for major fishkeeping magazines. These large South American shoaling fish need an aquarium that is at least 125 gallons, measuring 60 inches long, 18 inches wide and 30 inches tall, but when the fish are fully grown, a 165-gallon tank (measuring 72 inches long, 18 inches wide and 30 inches tall) would be more suitable. A smooth sand substrate at least 4 inches deep will allow the eartheater cichlids to engage in their habit of constantly sifting through the substrate in search of food without damaging their mouth and gills.