Has anyone used Unipac Aquarium Gravel - Silver Sand

I have heard of silver sand. I think it is inert, and is used in Great Britain for aquariums.
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Silica sand for FW systems? Hello, I am new to this site and Iam sure you have already encountered this question before, butplease bear with me. I currently have a 75gallon with 3 small Frontosas, 3 clown loaches, 1 Synodontiscatfish, and 1 Pleco. I had aquarium gravel in this tank but uponreading articles about these fish I found out they prefersand substrates. Many sites have said that you canuse pool filter sand as a substrate and I bought some. Aftercleaning it really well stirring it with my hands, Inoticed little cuts on them. Finding more sites,I now read that silica is actually sharp and will injure myfish, yet you said at one time you usedsandblasting sand. Isn't silica the samething? Is there a sand more suitable that isn't ascostly as what my LFS is charging? Thanks, Wanda
In conclusion silica sand would be a wise choice for any aquarium. Especially if the keeper does not need the substrate as a pH buffer.
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At Silver Sands Motel, you'll be just a 5-minute drive from Pier 60 Park and Clearwater Marine Aquarium. Guests can enjoy the outdoor pool or take advantage of nearby parasailing. Rooms feature kitchenettes and free WiFi. Silver sand is used to support the heating cable and distribute heat evenly. It compacts in the aquarium and contains little oxygen.
Photo provided by FlickrMy sand aquarium with silver dollar barbs, clown barbs, red and blue Gourami, Angle fish and Rainbow shark.
Photo provided by FlickrSilver sand is used to support the heating cable and distribute heat evenly. It compacts in the aquarium and contains little oxygen.
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Silver sand would be suited to any aquarium requiring a stable PH . Amazonian inhabitants In most cases require neutral to acidic water conditions and silica will remain inert under such circumstancesQuartz (silicon-dioxide, SiO2) is the least soluble of all forms of silicon found in nature. Although it is important to keep in mind that water is a universal solvent and everything dissolves in water given enough time, the walls of a glass aquarium is far more soluble than any layer of quartz sand that could be placed on the bottom of it. This is not to say that it is not possible to introduce silicate into your tank by the inclusion of silica sand – there are many more soluble silicate compounds (such as feldspar) or contaminants (such as aluminosilicate) which could be found in a generic bag of silica sand from the hardware store that could contribute to an increased level of dissolved silicates in an aquarium, but pure quartz sand is not one of them.Silica sand would be suited to any aquarium requiring a stable PH . Amazonian inhabitants In most cases require neutral to acidic water conditions and silica will remain inert under such circumstancesThe most easily obtained aquarium sand is coralsand, which as its name suggests is made up of finely ground coral,along with tiny pieces of things like seashells, calcareous algae, andsea urchin spines. Being made up largely of calcium carbonate, coralsand is a very effective buffering agent, increasing the pH andhardness levels of any aquarium it is used in. For this reason, coralsand cannot be used in any tank with fish that do not like hard,alkaline water, which includes the vast majority of community fish fromAsia, Africa, and South America, such as angelfish, tetras, barbs,catfish, gouramis, and loaches. On the other hand, those fish that doappreciate such conditions, such as Rift Valley cichlids, manylivebearers, and brackish water fish positively thrive in tanks withcoral sand.