Soil Substrate For Planted Nano Tank | My Aquarium Club

PLANTED AQUARIUM WITHOUT SOIL - YouTube
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Start your tests with only small amounts of soil worked into the bottom third of the substrate. You can always increase the ratio of soil to gravel in subsequent planted aquariums. Too much soil in the substrate (depending on the particular soil) can cause strongly anaerobic (no oxygen) conditions or lead to toxic conditions in the substrate, and even leach toxins into the water or leach enough nutrients into the water to causes algae problems. Only after at least six months to a year do I reach the point where I am comfortable using a test soil loose in the substrate of a large display aquarium. Testing is important — even potting soils vary tremendously from one brand to another.
PLANTED AQUARIUM WITHOUT SOIL
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When I joined the about four years ago, I attended my first official meeting at the home of Sean Murphy. Sean is a Fisheries Biologist by trade and has been employing mineralized soil in his planted aquariums for nearly two decades now. He developed a “recipe” for the soil substrate during his collegiate studies of wetlands soils. It is his recipe that I have recently begun using with great success. Aquarium Soil Brands? - The Planted Tank Forum
Photo provided by FlickrMr. Aqua Planted Aquarium Soil question - The Planted Tank Forum
Photo provided by FlickrMr. Aqua Planted Aquarium Soil ( Benefits and cleanliness ) - YouTube
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If your option is to save money with substrate, you can always go with sand as it is a natural substrate and can also blend in well with other substrates or potting soil, but it may cause filtration problems. One aspect some people do not know is that you can add up to four levels of planted aquarium substrate if you want.Using topsoil or potting soil as a substrate is not a new idea. Aquarists have been using this method to grow healthy aquatic plants for decades. However, this method does seem to pose some problems, namely algae outbreaks resulting from light intensity that is too strong. This is especially true when you first set up your aquarium with this type of substrate. The algae likely results from the excess nutrients that decomposing organic materials release in the soil. The decomposing organic materials are not bio-available to the aquatic plants. As the tank matures, the algae dissipate slowly as the organics in the soil finish breaking down.When I joined the about four years ago, I attended my first official meeting at the home of Sean Murphy. Sean is a Fisheries Biologist by trade and has been employing mineralized soil in his planted aquariums for nearly two decades now. He developed a “recipe” for the soil substrate during his collegiate studies of wetlands soils. It is his recipe that I have recently begun using with great success.Aqua Soil is a great option for planted aquariums with fish that thrive in softer water and lower pH levels. It has a decent price in terms of its quality and it’s completely organic too. Mineralizing the soil beforehand helps to speed the breakdown of organic materials in the soil. In turn the mineralized soil will help shorten the initial algae outbreak period that many aquarists experience when using a soil substrate. Soil mineralization occurs from exposing bacteria, enzymes and other soil microbes to oxygen in a moist environment. The microbes break down the organic materials in the soil into bio-available minerals. As an added bonus these new bio-available forms of nutrients are generally only available to plants and not to algae.In the aquascaping world, there are infinite choices regarding aquarium substrate: you can use clay, gravel, sand, ADA’s Aquasoil and many others. In aquascaping especially, your substrate will be fundamental for your end result. Why?, you might ask. Well, let’s ask a few questions first:
You want to use big, beautiful rocks in your tank? A good substrate will help you alleviate the stress on the glass, prevent cracking and make the rocks look more natural.
Do you want big, strong, lush plants and healthy fish swimming by? The proper aquarium substrate will help you nourish your plants and create the necessary chemical balance for both fish and plants.