check out my other video to learn how to take care of an oscar fish

Hopefully at the end of this video you will be an expert on taking care of Oscar fish!
Photo provided by Flickr
When feeding your Oscar at home, the most important factor in choosing what to feed, should be the long-term health of your pet. It is a commonly known fact that Oscars can, and will just about eat anything. But just as you and I should not dine at McDonald's every night, care should be taken to ensure that the Oscar receives a beneficial diet. A diet that mimics the nutrition a wild fish would eat is a good start.
Oscar fish care for fungus removing
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Luckily for the fish keeping world and its popularion of more or less experienced aquarists, Oscars are very easy to keep and make a great beginner fish. The only aspects of their care which might be difficult for a beginner are the facts that they grow very large very quickly and are not meant to be kept with other fish. As a large, predatory cichlid, they will need to be kept in an aquarium of at least 100 gallons or larger and will eat almost any other fish in their aqarium. It is thus recommended to only keep them either individually, as a breeding pair, or as a community member in a very large aquarium. oscar fish - how to care for them n breed them
Photo provided by FlickrOscar Fish – The Care, Feeding and Breeding of Oscars
Photo provided by FlickrOscar Fish – The Care, Feeding and Breeding of Oscars
Photo provided by Flickr
The Oscar fish, scientifically known as Astronotus Ocellatus or commonly known as a River Dog or Dog Fish, is one of the largest South American cichlids reaching about 12 inches long and is a fascinating fish to keep as a pet. Oscars are very docile fishes in relationship with its owner, but one must be very careful about its tank mates. One of the most fascinating aspects of keeping Oscar fish is their habit of rooting among the accessories in their tanks. They can easily lift out plants and even move rocks across the aquarium floor. Like their namesake, Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple, they are the messy fish in the aquarium. Don't be surprised if they dig trenches in the gravel, move your carefully positioned plants, and otherwise change their tank. Oscars are fairly large fish, typically reaching lengths betweentwelve and sixteen inches (thirty to forty centimeters). These fishgenerally live for eight to twelve years, depending on the quality ofcare given.A big fish can take a lot of punishment. They can shake of maltreatment (albeit with other consequences, such as HITH) to a much greater degree than a little one can. Younger fish also have more to lose - if it doesn't grow properly (stunting due to poor water quality, for example) it will live a much-shortened lifespan and may never be able to handle diseases well. It's no secret that more water per fish = better water quality with the same amount of work. I dare say that because of this, a young fish needs more space than an adult fish of equal size (a three-inch oscar needs more water than a three-inch convict). (NOTE - I am in no way implying that you should maltreat your adult fish! There is an immense difference between surviving and thriving, and every fish deserves the best of care that we can manage) When keeping Oscars as aquarium fish, choose a commercial fish food suitable for carnivorous fish like Oscars and other cichlids, and supplement their diet with mealworms and insects. They will eat other fish, so be careful about placing smaller fish such as in the tank with them unless choosing feeder fish specifically to enhance your Oscar fish's diet. The Oscar fish is one of the most popular aquarium fish in the world. It’s sold as a “beginner” fish but I would personally disagree with that just because of the tank size the fish needs to live in. Blah blah blah! Life is short so let’s start this 7 step care guide.