Fish Identification: Jack Species

Jackknifefish are carnivorous fish that feed on crabs, shrimp and other small invertebrates.
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The Senegal jack is an species, living semi-pelagically, moving between surface and bottom layers in coastal waters. It is confidently known to range to a depth of at least 90 m, although may live at depths of around 200 m. Older fish tend to live further from the shore on , while juveniles inhabit shallow tidal and lined with . The species is also known to occur in in significant numbers, inhabiting these on a semi-permanent basis.
Carangidae is a family of fish which includes the jacks, , , runners, and scads.
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Seal worms are found in salmon, mackerel, Pacific rockfish, jacksmelt, some halibut and other flounders -- even shad on the West Coast. This is why mackerel are treated with vinegar in sushi preparation. These worms are little brown things that curl up like a spring. You can miss them if you don't look carefully, but if you are looking (and always look with jacksmelt and herring) you can pick them out. Banded rudderfish are slimmer, with a less deep body than other amberjacks.
Photo provided by FlickrJack Dempsey are readily available available both online and in fish stores and are inexpensive.
Photo provided by FlickrJack Dempsey are readily available available both online and in fish stores and are inexpensive.
Photo provided by Flickr
, any of numerous species of fishes belonging to the family (order Perciformes). The name jack is also applied collectively to the family. Representatives can be found in temperate and tropical portions of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans and occasionally in fresh or brackish water. Although body size and shape vary greatly among jacks, many of the more than 150 species are characterized by laterally compressed bodies, a row of enlarged scales (scutes) along the side near the tailfin, small scales resulting in a smooth appearance, and a deeply forked tail. Many have a bluish green, silvery, or yellowish sheen on the body. Jacks are important commercially and are favoured sports fishes.The total recreational catch for jack crevalle has been relatively low in South Carolina in the last ten years with a 10 year average of 4,955 fish per year. There were three years in this time period (2004-2006) where there was no reported catch. The peak catches for jack crevalle occurred in the mid 1980’s have remained relatively low since that time. There are no reported commercial landings for jack crevalle in South Carolina for the 1950-2012 time period.Some of the most popular marine game fishes are the (genus Seriola), which are found worldwide. The (S. dumerili) of the tropical Atlantic is one of the largest members of the jack family, often attaining lengths of 1.8 m (6 feet). The genus Caranx includes several species of smaller but popular game , such as the crevalle jack (C. hippos) of warm Atlantic waters and the yellow jack (C. bartholomaei), which frequents warm Atlantic waters and is noted for its golden-yellow sides and fins.McBride RS, KA McKown. 2000. Consequences of dispersal of subtropically spawned crevalle jacks, Caranx hippos, to temperate estuaries. Fish Bull 98: 528-538.Berry FH. 1959. Young jack crevalles (Caranx species) off the southeastern Atlantic coast of the United States. U.S. Fish Wildl. Serv Fish. Bull. 152: 417-535. Jackfish are a large family of sleek predators, native to warm and temperate waters around the world. Several varieties are found along the Eastern Seaboard as far north as Nova Scotia, though they become less common as you move away from warmer Southern waters. They're enjoyed as game fish throughout their range, and in some areas they're the subject of a limited commercial harvest. The flesh of jacks is well flavored and firmer than most fish, which makes them suitable for grilling.