Sand Vs. Gravel in a Freshwater Aquarium - Pets

Your aquarium illuminates with a very natural brightness
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Also, do some research to decide what fish will thrive with a sand substrate and which won't do as good.
Sand can be used in salt and some freshwater tanks. Don't use sand with Goldfish, for example, because they will just grab mouthfuls of it when looking for food, and obviously, that's not good for them.
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If you are considering using sand as the base for your goldfish tank, it is important to ensure that you buy sand that is specially designed for use with freshwater fish. Marine fish require a sand substrate that is known as “live sand,” and contains salt, bacteria and microorganisms that are designed to work well with a , but that will be unsuitable for a freshwater set up. I recommend CaribSea
Photo provided by FlickrWhat is the best sand to use as substrate
Photo provided by FlickrI plan on having a freshwater tank
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Some sands, like marine sand, can change the PH in the water, so make sure the change your particular will create will not be harmful to the fish you want to keep. You can get away with coral sand in an African cichlid tank because coral sand will raise the pH naturally and freshwater African cichlids actually like that.The bottom of the tank is one of the mostneglected parts of the aquarium, and as far as many aquarists areconcerned there really isn't much to consider. In a freshwatertank, you use gravel, and in a marine tank coral sand. If the tank hasan undergravel filter, you'll need a fair depth of the stuff, butif it's just a decorative covering to hide the floor of the tank,then you only need enough to hide the glass. So is that really all youneed to know about aquarium substrates? Definitely not! Choosing anunusual substrate is a great way to give a tank a distinctive look, andmore importantly there are many types of fish that appreciate specifictypes of substrate. Gravel and sand Read the product description. It sounds good to me, but I wanted your opinions before I got it :) I had assumed this would be marine (salt water) sand and therefore not useable for freshwater, but according to the information on the website it is totally inert and suitable for freshwater tanks. That being the case, it will work. They say there are different colours, so I would definitely choose a darker natural looking sand colour, because plants look better against a darker substrate (and background), and depending upon the fish you intend to keep they usually look better with a darker substrate because they feel more secure and their natural colours are usually darker as a result. I have found this with gravel, the same characins (tetras) and corys in a tank with pale buff-coloured gravel that were moved to a tank with dark gravel showed a significant colour change to their natural darker hue; not surprising, since these fish come from waters with dark substrates (generally). SA fish and SE Asian fish all do better with darker substrates; they come from naturally dark waters and thus exhibit better colouration when provided an environment that more closely replicates the natural habitat.As a freshwater aquarist, I have always envied the colorful, sandy-bottomed tanks kept by marine hobbyist. Outside of having a cichlid tank (thanks but no thanks), I can't emulate the colorful beauty of ocean fish. However, I can have that handsome sand settling across the bottom of my freshwater tank. After mulling over it for a year or so, I decided to take the plunge and convert from gravel to sand. So with fish like catfish and spiny eels -- not tomention loaches, mormyrids, gobies, earth-eating cichlids, andfreshwater flatfish -- you really want to keep them in a tank with asofter substrate than gravel. Sand is an easy to use option, butaquarists do need to bear in mind that there are at least threedifferent types they are likely to encounter. Each has its uses, butbecause of their very different chemical properties they are not allequally suitable for any given aquarium. Also, do some research to decide what fish will thrive with a sand substrate and which won't do as good.
Sand can be used in salt and some freshwater tanks. Don't use sand with Goldfish, for example, because they will just grab mouthfuls of it when looking for food, and obviously, that's not good for them.