All you Angelfish owners out there

Unlike common freshwater angelfish, altum angels will rarely eat flake food
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Contrary to popular belief, there is rarely enough algae in home aquaria to support the needs of marine herbivores, such as surgeonfish and angelfish. These species should be provided with a suitable alternative. While blanched curly lettuce and spinach have been used in the past, dried algae sheets known as nori are now recommended. Because nori is made from marine algae, it is assumed to be a better food for freshwater fish than terrestrial plants. Nori is inexpensive and widely sold in Asian food stores as well as many grocery stores.
Title: Effect of Replacing Live Food with Formulated Feed on Reproductive Performance of Freshwater Angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare (Shcultze, 1823)
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Being freshwater fish, angelfish are able to eat whatever is fed to them from small worms to small pieces of vegetables. Angelfish relish live foods which can be worms, meat and insects purchased from fish store. The most healthy diet includes Black worms, Bloodworms, Brine shrimp. Aug 26, 2010 - The freshwater angelfish, due to its aggressive food habits, is a non fussy eater and if kept in a tank, eats all kind of frozen, dried or live food.
Photo provided by FlickrI was wondering what do you feed your fish
Photo provided by FlickrWhat is the best foods to feed them
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Freshwater Angelfish are not picky eaters. They will go after many types of fish food, including vitamin enriched flakes, frozen, freeze dried and live foods.Unlike common freshwater angelfish, altum angels will rarely eat flake food. Wild-caught specimens will usually eat only live food at first. Altum angelfish will generally eat live brine shrimp enthusiastically. You can wean some specimens onto frozen foods by feeding both live and frozen food at the same time. Bloodworms keep altums healthy but are generally available only frozen.Altum angelfish (Pterophyllum altum) show up less often in pet shops than their cousins the common freshwater angelfish (P. scarlae). While altums are arguably the more handsome fish, their demanding care requirements explain this discrepancy. Altum angelfish are extremely sensitive to water conditions and require more specialized foods than their more common cousins.TetraMin Tropical Flakes is usually on our go-to recommendations for almost every freshwater aquarium fish, and it’s always part of the foods that we give to our angelfish.Freshwater angelfish feed on smaller and in their as well as eating particles of food found in the water. The angelfish is preyed upon by larger of , and marine mammals.First, freshwater angelfish tend to produce a lot of fry each time they spawn, so when the fry become mobile, they take up a lot of space in the aquarium as they spread out looking for food. Unfortunately, if there are other tropical fish in the aquarium, any of the fry that wander away from the watchful gaze of their parents will likely be eaten. Many species of aquarium fish find fry to be an almost irresistible addition to the menu. To limit the losses of the fry, remove any other tropical fish housed in the aquarium. The length of time you can leave angelfish (Pterophyllum) fry with their parents depends on a number of things. However, because you are removing them after they have become free-swimming indicates that the parents are not given to eating their own offspring, as is somewhat common in freshwater angelfish – at least the domesticated varieties.First, freshwater angelfish tend to produce a lot of fry each time they spawn, so when the fry become mobile, they take up a lot of space in the aquarium as they spread out looking for food. Unfortunately, if there are other tropical fish in the aquarium, any of the fry that wander away from the watchful gaze of their parents will likely be eaten. Many species of aquarium fish find fry to be an almost irresistible addition to the menu. To limit the losses of the fry, remove any other tropical fish housed in the aquarium.Another predator to your freshwater angelfish fry could be your filtration system. are notorious for sucking up fry that venture too close to the intake tube. However, there’s an easy solution to that problem. You can “muzzle” your filter by simply wrapping the intake tube (and factory-supplied screen) with a piece of foam – in fact, an old filter insert would work very well for that. Keep the foam in place until the fry are no longer small enough to get through the factory-supplied screen on the end of the intake tube.If there’s no predatory threat to your freshwater angelfish fry, and they have regular access to appropriate food, you should be able to leave the fry with the pair for at least three weeks. The longer you leave the fry with the pair, the more it will delay the onset of another reproductive cycle. Eventually the parents will tire of their fry, but by then you will have had to thin out the population unless you’ve spawned them in a very large aquarium. Be careful. It is easy to inadvertently overstock an aquarium by leaving in the offspring of a successful spawning. Once the fry look like little freshwater angelfish, it is probably time to move them and give the adult pair a break. Good luck!…shrimp is a great frozen food option for all omnivorous and carnivorous aquarium fish (freshwater and saltwater) including Guppies, Platys, Angelfish, Tetras, Barbs, Catfish, Swordfish, Mollies, Gouramis, Rainbow Fish, Freshwater Sharks, Seahorses, Marine Angelfish, Clownfish, Damsel Fish, Butterfly…