Fish Tanks & Aquarium Systems for Sale Online | PetSolutions

Unique Fish Tanks | fish tanks and aquariums for quite awhile. We normally see fish tanks ...
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Aquarium supplies are some of our best sellers here at Big Al’s Pets. This is largely because we offer our shoppers an extensive selection of products from their favorite brands. No matter what type of fish you keep, you can create the perfect aquarium environment with our top-notch products. From compact bowls for Betta fish to your basic five-gallon tank, we make it affordable an easy to enjoy a few smaller fish in your home. For those with a larger collection of fish, we carry top-of-the-line aquarium systems, including tanks that can hold up to 175 gallons. And with some of our deluxe aquarium packages, you can get everything you need with one click of your mouse. Meanwhile, those that like to build their systems from scratch can find and buy individual aquarium supplies at great prices on our site.
Large Fish Tanks for Sale | Big Fish Tanks & Aquariums | Petco
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Most novice fish owners begin with a freshwater bowl or other types of beginner fish tanks. A desktop aquarium kit complete with a freshwater fish tank, filter, filter cartridge, lighted hood, water conditioner, and fish food is the perfect way to get started as an aquarist. While these kits contain the basic accessories most beginner fish tanks need, there is more fun to be had in choosing your own plants, rocks, colored substrates and decorative ornaments. There are saltwater aquariums that have been specifically designed for display on shelves, while some are equipped with reversible backgrounds to change with your mood or home décor. There are even octagon-shaped fish tanks that act as unique tables, hold up to 28-gallons of water, and never fail as an interesting conversation piece for entertaining guests. Unique Fish Tanks | fish tanks and aquariums for quite awhile
Photo provided by FlickrLooking to buy some badass fish tanks and decorations? FishTankBank has the ultimate selection of aquariums and accessories that are perfect for all fish!
Photo provided by Flickr44 Items - Discount fish tanks at PetSmart offer value and quality. Our aquariums are on sale for a limited time!
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FishLore provides aquarium fish tank information for tropical fish hobbyists, covering both freshwater and saltwater aquariums. We present aquarium fish tank information in an easy to understand way so that more can enjoy our wonderful hobby! Consider joining us on the forum where you will find people that like to talk about fish tanks as much as you!
This article will give you a general introduction into the three main types of saltwater tanks. When getting started with saltwater it is recommended to get the biggest tank you can accommodate. Bigger tanks give you more room for error when it comes to water quality and this is especially important for salt water fish and invertebrates. There are basically three types of saltwater aquarium setups: Fish Only, Fish Only with Live Rock - FOWLR, Reef Tanks.Much of the information available here is derived from my opinionsand based on over two decadesof raising tropical fish, maintaining my own tanks, helping friends toget their own aquaria started, extensive reading of literatureavailable regarding the aquarium hobby and industry, and, morerecently, running the fish department at Bozeman Pet Center. I havealso incorporated information based on feedback I have gotten fromothers who may have more experience with specific equipment andinformation based on some of the most frequently asked I get. I have also included someinformation on why people often get from varioussources on fish care.Watch more How to Take Care of an Aquarium videos:



When deciding on what shark to get, you want the best shark for your fish take. It first depends if you have a freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. The sharks that you'll find for freshwater tanks are not true sharks. They're not cartilaginous. They're bony fishes. Their fin patterns and their morphology closely resemble saltwater sharks, so for that reason they're called sharks, but they're not true sharks.

Saltwater is where you'd find the real sharks. For freshwater, most of the shark get very, very large. The iridescent sharks, tricolor sharks, they get really, really big, I mean, three to four feet in nature, but they happen to be very hardy. So you can keep them in a small aquarium, maybe 30 to 50 gallons in size. But they're going to quickly outgrow it, and it's cruel to keep a fish that gets three or four feet in nature restricted to a tank that's only three or four feet long. It's just really, really cruel, so I don't recommend a lot of the freshwater fish that are called sharks for home aquariums. If you have to have a freshwater fish that's called a shark, you can get a redtail shark. They don't get as big. The flying foxes kind of look like sharks. They don't get terribly large.

But for saltwater, the sharks that I would recommend are any of the cat sharks, bamboo, banded cats, dog chain. Those sharks stay on the bottom. Even the epaulettes from Australia, those are really cute sharks. They walk around on their pectoral fins. They also get large, so you want to make sure you have a large aquarium, but because they're not pelagic swimmers like black tips and white tips, any of the open swimming sharks, they're more suitable to home aquariums.

If you have to have something that looks like a great white or a baby great white, like a black tip, you're going to need a really large tank, and those tanks are very expensive. I'm talking, people would recommend a 200 to 300 gallon tank. I wouldn't put them in anything less than 1000 gallons. That tank needs to be round in shape. It needs to be eight to ten feet in diameter. They're just not going to fare well in anything smaller. And the upkeep and the maintenance on an aquarium like that is pretty staggering. You really have to know what you're doing. You need to have a lot of money or be really into this hobby to be that dedicated to keep one these open water reef sharks.

So to wrap it up, for saltwater, I would recommend one of the bottom-dwelling cat sharks. Nurse sharks are really good when they're small, but they get really large, so I don't feel that they're suitable for captivity. And then for freshwater, redtail sharks, tri-colors or balas sharks or iridescent sharks are great when they're small. But again, they're going to get really large and you're going to have to get them a much bigger tank, like the 200 to 300 gallon tank to keep them when they're adults.