My betta eats the frog's food - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care

Male betta with African Dwarf Frogs - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
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First I would try to rule out any issues with the environment that may have changed from the old set-up (temperature, ammonia levels, pH, change in filter current, etc.). If everything is good, then it may be the presence of the betta that is affecting the way your frogs behave. I too have had this happen. That said, they can still be housed together successfully so long as your frogs are getting enough to eat. I would see how things go over the next two weeks. As they get used to the adjustment, (not just with the new fish but with the new tank) they may start to swim and sing again. If they are still hiding after a couple of weeks then you might want to look into a tank divider, refugium, or a second tank.
african dwarf frogs with a betta? - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
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I have a betta and 3 ADFs! I was told when introducing ADFs to a tank with a betta fish to make sure the betta has been in his tank for at least a couple months. And to make sure there are plenty of hiding spots for the frogs. When I first put mine in, my fish was curious and following them around. The. He tries nipping and I tapped on the glass. He eventually for immune to my tappig so I would gently tap him directly. He stopped after 2 days and then ignored them. After the frogs got bigger they would nip at my fish and I did the same thing with them. The main key when introducing the two species I find is just keepig an eye on them the first few days... Its been 3 months now and my frogs are not scared anymore and my betta swims freely without noticing the frogs :) Rainbow Frogs - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
Photo provided by FlickrMy African Dwarf Frogs and Betta Fish! - YouTube
Photo provided by FlickrBetta and African Dwarf Frogs - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
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In most cases, your African dwarf frog's occasional nipping won't harm your fish. But your frog's little mouth can tear the fins of long-finned fish, such as bettas. Fin injuries invite bacteria and fungus to invade, causing fin rot and other infections. If you notice your frog ripping away at your fish's fins, it's best to move either the frog or fish to another tank. Some fish -- bettas are notorious for this -- bite their own fins when bored or swimming in poor water conditions, so it's best if you catch your African dwarf frog in the act before moving one or the other.Some of the nastiest fights I have bared witness to involved an African Dwarf Frog and a male Betta splenden. I have actually seen my entire betta’s head, up to the gills, inside the mouth of my frog as the two summersault (think crocodile death roll) in the center of my 6 gallon aquarium. Spats like these should be rare, however if you see them often or if one or the other gets hurt you may want to consider separating the fish from the frogs.Some of the nastiest fights I have bared witness to involved an African Dwarf Frog and a male Betta splenden. I have actually seen my entire betta’s head, up to the gills, inside the mouth of my frog as the two summersault (think crocodile death roll) in the center of my 6 gallon aquarium. Spats like these should be rare, however if you see them often or if one or the other gets hurt you may want to consider separating the fish from the frogs.Thanks for this post. I have 2 ADFs in with my male betta, Reggie, and so far everything is fine EXCEPT for adjusting the feeding, which is tricky. Since they’re in a small tank with only one fish, the way I handle it is to remove Reggie and feed him in a small tupperware container, and then hand feed the frogs. This is pretty time consuming, and I can see it being a real pain in the rear if you have a lot of fish in the aquarium. I know some people who remove the frogs and put them in another tank with shallow water and a bunch of food — if my frogs were easier to catch I guess I’d try that, but at least with hand feeding I know how much they’ve eaten.
This also prevents my betta from gorging himself silly on bloodworms, the little piggy.Long story short: is a clawed frog and betta fish possible to be housed in the same tank, if the tank is 15 gallons+? My last clawed frog tended to hang around at the bottom of the tank only and my current betta is more of a mid-tank dweller. I know clawed frogs can get pretty big too.Frogs have very poor eyesight and are slow feeders who prefer bloodworms although many can learn to eat the bites. For this reason they're better off in a species tank as they cannot compete with most fish. They can also be harassed and bitten by a betta and they are defenseless.