Probably the most common disease among fish is ich

Best Way To Treat Ich? | My Aquarium Club
Photo provided by Flickr
Potassium Permanganate has been suggested as an alternative to copper for treating ich, especially in soft water fish. It is primarily used in ponds, and is not, in my opinion, the best choice for aquarium use. It most certainly is not for the beginner. It can be purchased under its chemical name or found as the active ingredient in products such as Flukes Control® by Aquatronics. As with so many chemicals, there’s a fine line between calling it a wonder drug and a lethal substance. It is not really a medication but an oxidizing agent that reacts with organic material, resulting in the destruction of external bacteria, fungus, and parasites. For that reason, it is considerably less effective with excessive nitrates present, because its oxidizing power is “used up” on the dissolved organics in the water and is consequently not effective against the target pathogen. It is often used by retailers as a dip for incoming plants, to eliminate snails and their eggs. It is toxic in high doses, especially in high pH water; there are better choices for treating African rift lake cichlids. It is not safe for eggs and fry, and excessive treatments can cause gill damage in adults. It will damage your biological filter, kill algae, and reduce the oxygen concentration in the water; strong aeration and water movement is critical. It can be tough on live plants and catfish, and should not be combined with any other chemicals – especially Formalin. It can burn your skin and eyes, and will stain your hands and clothing brown; gloves are recommended. It cannot be removed with carbon like other meds; it is neutralized with hydrogen peroxide but I don't know exactly how that is accomplished safely in the aquarium. Again this is for the advanced fishkeeper.
Would Ich cause the fish to die
Photo provided by Flickr
While the graceful movements and fluttering fins of pet fish never cease to fascinate and entertain people, an injured or sick fish may not be as entertaining or enjoyable to watch. Fortunately, there are fish medications available that have been developed to treat various fish diseases and infections as well as various types of fish medicine and vitamin supplements. Prevalent among many aquarium fish, Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, otherwise referred to as Ick or Ich, is a protozoan disease that can be fatal if left untreated. As Ick treatments are readily available, it's important for fish hobbyists and aquarists to monitor the appearance and behavior of their fish regularly in order to identify and treat this disease at an early stage. In addition to Ick and Ick treatments, there are other types of infections and external parasites that fish are susceptible to contracting that can be treated with the correct type of fish medicine or treatment solution. Give your fish the best care possible by preventing them from developing high stress levels, providing them with plenty of food and a well-maintained tank, as well as essential vitamins and minerals, and immediately administering fish medications at the initial sign of a disease or infection. I also wanted to know about adding salt to the water
Photo provided by FlickrHow to Treat Tropical Fish with White Spot Disease (Ich)
Photo provided by FlickrWelcome to API Fishcare: SUPER ICK CURE™
Photo provided by Flickr
There are other antiparasitic medications available, but I believe I've covered those most commonly used. Clout® by Aquarium Products is one more worth mentioning since it appears on nearly every LFS and pet store shelf that carries fish and is often recommended as a cure-all. It is an extremely strong blend of medications which I am unfamiliar with, including dimethylamino, phenyl benzylidene, and cyclohexadiene. I believe it is best suited for internal parasites. It is definitely not to be used with scaleless fish. Read the label carefully.Copper based medications: Copper based medications are all around bad for invertebrates and scaleless fish species. The possible fluctuation of kH and pH also is a huge worry for most aquarists. Products that use copper sulfate as active ingredients include Coppersafe and General Cure. The increased metal levels in the tank cause an alkalinity swing which in turn could cause lower kH levels allowing pH swings to occur. Fish that are not hardy can suffer from the protozoan as well as the increased stress of level fluctuations. Copper medications are best kept out of tanks with scaleless fish species or invertebrates.Potassium Permanganate has been suggested as an alternative to copper for treating ich, especially in soft water fish. It is primarily used in ponds, and is not in my opinion the best choice for aquarium use. It most certainly is not for the beginner. It can be purchased under its chemical name, or found as the active ingredient in products such as Flukes Control® by Aquatronics. As with so many chemicals, there’s a fine line between calling it a wonder drug and a lethal substance. It is not really a medication but an oxidizing agent that reacts with organic material, resulting in the destruction of external bacteria, fungus and parasites. For that reason, it is considerably less effective with excessive nitrates present, because its oxidizing power is “used up” on the dissolved organics in the water and is consequently not effective against the target pathogen. It is often used by retailers as a dip for incoming plants, to eliminate snails and their eggs. It is toxic in high doses, especially in high pH water; there are better choices for treating African rift lake cichlids. It is not safe for eggs and fry, and excessive treatments can cause gill damage in adults. It will damage your biological filter, kill algae, and reduce oxygen concentration in the water; strong aeration and water movement is critical. It can be tough on live plants and catfish, and should not be combined with any other chemicals – especially Formalin. It can burn your skin and eyes, and will stain your hands and clothing brown; gloves are recommended. It cannot be removed with carbon like other meds; it is neutralized with hydrogen peroxide but I don’t know exactly how that is accomplished safely in the aquarium. Again… this is for the advanced fishkeeper.If treating Ich with medicine you must remove any form of or you’ll be removing the medication. It’s also best to raise the temperature to the low 80’s, depending on what type of fish you keep. This is because the warmer temperature speeds up ich’s life-cycle so it will fall off of the fish faster and become vulnerable to medication.