10 Most Colorful Freshwater Fish | Home Aquaria

fish that will look just as good as a bright and multicolored saltwater fish.
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So you are ready to dive in to the tropical world that is fish keeping? Let me tell you, there is a lot of information out there, and a lot of fish too. If this is your first ever home aquarium, and you have never kept fish before, then this article is going to be the best possible starting point. We have conjured up a list of 13 tropical , that are perfect for both beginners, and advanced fishkeepers alike. Let’s take a look at what constitutes a good ‘freshwater fish for beginners’.
The Best and Worst Beginner Fish for Your Aquarium | PetHelpful
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Whenever you enter a room with a fish tank, it always feels at home with such a decoration around. The fish tanks are mostly created to bring in more style and in a room other than just housing the fish pet. You do not need to go for a big aquarium, a small one with impressive design will still provide the best décor that you actually need. You can place it on your office desk or at home and look at the fish tank whenever you feel bored for that perfect relaxation. Below are more benefits that you will enjoy with having a fish tank in your home. Feb 6, 2016 - An aquarium guide to five of the best fish you can keep to start your aquarium ..
Photo provided by FlickrThis leads to many difficulties when you bring the fish home.
Photo provided by FlickrTop 10 Best Tropical Fish for Beginners | PetHelpful
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As a beginner, you want to choose the tropical fish that give you the best chance of success with your home aquarium. There is a lot to learn for the fish keeper who is just starting out, and picking fish that are fun and easy to care for is important.Acclimate your fish. Fish are fragile. For best results, ask the store associate what their water parameters for nitrate, nitrite, ammonia and pH levels are. When home, test your aquarium water for its chemistry. The greater the differences, the longer you need to acclimate your fish.Watch more How to Take Care of an Aquarium videos:



When deciding on what shark to get, you want the best shark for your fish take. It first depends if you have a freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. The sharks that you'll find for freshwater tanks are not true sharks. They're not cartilaginous. They're bony fishes. Their fin patterns and their morphology closely resemble saltwater sharks, so for that reason they're called sharks, but they're not true sharks.

Saltwater is where you'd find the real sharks. For freshwater, most of the shark get very, very large. The iridescent sharks, tricolor sharks, they get really, really big, I mean, three to four feet in nature, but they happen to be very hardy. So you can keep them in a small aquarium, maybe 30 to 50 gallons in size. But they're going to quickly outgrow it, and it's cruel to keep a fish that gets three or four feet in nature restricted to a tank that's only three or four feet long. It's just really, really cruel, so I don't recommend a lot of the freshwater fish that are called sharks for home aquariums. If you have to have a freshwater fish that's called a shark, you can get a redtail shark. They don't get as big. The flying foxes kind of look like sharks. They don't get terribly large.

But for saltwater, the sharks that I would recommend are any of the cat sharks, bamboo, banded cats, dog chain. Those sharks stay on the bottom. Even the epaulettes from Australia, those are really cute sharks. They walk around on their pectoral fins. They also get large, so you want to make sure you have a large aquarium, but because they're not pelagic swimmers like black tips and white tips, any of the open swimming sharks, they're more suitable to home aquariums.

If you have to have something that looks like a great white or a baby great white, like a black tip, you're going to need a really large tank, and those tanks are very expensive. I'm talking, people would recommend a 200 to 300 gallon tank. I wouldn't put them in anything less than 1000 gallons. That tank needs to be round in shape. It needs to be eight to ten feet in diameter. They're just not going to fare well in anything smaller. And the upkeep and the maintenance on an aquarium like that is pretty staggering. You really have to know what you're doing. You need to have a lot of money or be really into this hobby to be that dedicated to keep one these open water reef sharks.

So to wrap it up, for saltwater, I would recommend one of the bottom-dwelling cat sharks. Nurse sharks are really good when they're small, but they get really large, so I don't feel that they're suitable for captivity. And then for freshwater, redtail sharks, tri-colors or balas sharks or iridescent sharks are great when they're small. But again, they're going to get really large and you're going to have to get them a much bigger tank, like the 200 to 300 gallon tank to keep them when they're adults. The amount of food you give your fish is important. That said, do not overfeed the animal. You have probably heard this before and it is true. While overfeeding won’t make your fish explode, it will contaminate the water, making the tank an unpleasant place to live. In addition, an excessive amount of food particles in the tank can clog the filters, which also causes the water to become toxic. It depends on the type, size, and breed of your fish. Try sprinkling a small amount of food in the fish's tank and watch. Your fish should eat its fill in about five minutes. Experiment and take notes until you find appropriate amount for your fish. However, it is better to err on the side of caution -- at least at first -- and feed the fish too little rather than too much. This will also depend on the fish's breed and size. Most fish only require a once-a-day feeding, though some people like to split it into two smaller feedings. Consult your veterinarian or the fish experts at your local aquarium to learn about the daily requirements for your particular breed. But be aware that a fish will eat even when it's not hungry. So there is no point feeding your water-bound pet three times a day, when once a day is sufficient. Some food is breed-specific. Other types are based on whether the fish is of fresh or salt water. Some fish even eat live food (e.g., worms, shrimp, and fruit flies), so make sure to get this information before purchasing the fish and bringing it home, especially if you get queasy at the site of one live creature eating another. Regardless of the type of food, fish, much like other animals, require daily nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and protein. Again, consult your veterinarian or the fish experts at your local aquarium to best fulfill these needs for your pet fish. When storing food, it is best to keep it in the freezer to help preserve the vitamin content. And for the best nutritional value, only buy enough food for the month. That way you will be able to have the healthiest fish possible.It may be seem like a difficult ordeal to feed your fish, but really it is not. As long as you don't indulge your underwater pet by giving it some crackers to munch on, you should be fine. Anyways, fish aren't much into snacking. Good luck at feeding time.