Anchors and Crabs baby quilt for my Grandson w Tiger Fish

goliath african baby tigerfish - YouTube
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The Green Tiger Barb is developed from the Tiger Barb, which is moderately easy to breed. Raising the fry is relatively simple. They become sexually mature at about 6 to 7 weeks when they attain a size between 3/4 of an inch to just over an inch in length (2 - 3 cm). Select breeding pairs that have excellent markings and strong color.These barbs are egg layers that scatter their eggs rather than using a specific breeding site. The eggs are adhesive and will fall to the substrate. These fish can spawn in a 20-gallon breeding tank. It can be set up with a sponge filter, a heater, and some plants. Marbles used as substrate will help protect the eggs. The water should be a medium hardness of 10° dGH, slightly acidic with a pH of about 6.5, and a temperature between 74 and 79° F (24 - 26° C).Condition the pair with a variety of live foods, such as brine shrimp. Introduce the female to the breeding tank first, and add the male after a couple of days, when the female is full of eggs. The courting ritual will start in the late afternoon with them swimming around each other. The male will perform headstands and spread his fins to excite the female. The spawn will take place in the morning, with the male chasing and nipping the female. The female will begin releasing 1 to 3 eggs at a time. Up to 300 eggs will be released, though mature females can hold 700 or more.After the spawn, remove the parents as they will eat the eggs. The eggs will hatch in about 48 hours, and fry will be free-swimming in about 5 days. Feed the fry infusoria, a liquid fry food, or newly hatched baby brine at least 3 times a day. Pay close attention when feeding as uneaten foods can quickly foul the water, and the fry require clean water to survive. See the description of breeding techniques in . Also, see for information about types of foods for raising the young.
Baby Tiger Fish 3.5
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The Albino Tiger Barb is developed from the Tiger Barb, which is moderately easy to breed, and raising the fry is relatively simple. These fish become sexually mature at about 6 to 7 weeks of age when they have attained a size between about 3/4 of an inch to just over an inch in length (2 - 3 cm). Select breeding pairs from the school that have excellent markings and strong color.These fish are egg layers that scatter their eggs rather than having a specific breeding site. The eggs are adhesive and will fall to the substrate. These fish can spawn in a 20-gallon breeding tank, which can be set up with a sponge filter, a heater, and some plants. Marbles used as substrate will help protect the eggs. The water should be a medium hardness of 10° dGH, slightly acidic with a pH of about 6.5, and a temperature between 74 to 79° F (24 - 26° C).Condition the pair with a variety of live foods like brine shrimp. Introduce the female to the breeding tank first and add the male after a couple of days, when the female is full of eggs. The courting ritual will start in the late afternoon with them swimming around each other, and the male performing headstands and spreading his fins to excite the female. The spawn will take place in the morning, with the male chasing and nipping the female. The female will begin releasing 1 to 3 eggs at a time. Up to 300 eggs will be release, though more mature females can hold 700 or more.After the spawn, remove the parents as they will eat the eggs. The eggs will hatch in about 48 hours and the fry will be free swimming in about 5 days. The free swimming fry can be fed infusoria, a liquid fry food, or newly hatched baby brine at least three times a day. Pay close attention when feeding, as foods if uneaten can quickly foul the water. The fry will require clean water to survive. See the description of breeding techniques in: . Also see for information about types of foods for raising the young. baby african tiger fish about 3 months old
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Photo provided by FlickrBaby Indonesian Tiger Datnoid fish eating pellets fish food
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