Aquarium Heater Size Guide - Bing images

Find the right size of heater for your aquarium with this handy heater size guide.
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If you want your little friend to live comfortably and stress free, we recommend a minimum of 2.5 gallons. It is possible to keep bettas in smaller tanks or bowls, but they will require more cleaning and maintenance. Choosing a larger tank will ensure a healthier environment for your betta and his or her friends. You’ll spend less time fussing with the larger tank and performing water changes. You’ll have the far more room to decorate, meaning you can have live plants and fun decorations. Most tanks for sale at the size recommended will come with a filter already which means there is less for you to purchase. You will still need other aquarium supplies, some of which include gravel, an , and . If you are looking for betta food, our best Betta food guide is the place to start.
Aquarium Heater Size Guide - Bing images
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After this guide on finding the best 30 gallon aquarium heater you should be more than prepared to make the right choice. Because of the similar size these choices also make great 29 gallon fish tank heaters. If your tank can fit it I cannot recommend Ehiem highly enough, but the other options are still worth considering. If you need a few more options feel free to read my more general guide. After using this guide, you will be able to understand why the proper aquarium heater is necessary for a fish tank.
Photo provided by FlickrThe Aquarium Heater Guide | The Aquarium Guide
Photo provided by FlickrThe Importance of a Fish Tank Heater | The Aquarium Guide
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For those tanks pushing past the standard 10 gallons, these heaters are perfect for the 17-20 gallon aquarium sizes. A lot like the aquarium heater guide above, but specialized for 30 gallon tanks. One other thing to mention is that if you have a larger size aquarium and the temperature of your home is 25°+ degrees colder than you want your aquarium heated to, you can install a second heater following the same guidelines as stated above. For larger sized fish tanks, doubling up on your heaters rather than purchasing one very strong heater will let your aquarium distribute heat more efficiently.So, and example of this aquarium heater guideline would be: Say the ambient temperature of your home is 70°F. You have a 10 gallon aquarium that you need to be heated to 78°F. For a single setting heater, you would need 25 watts of power to get that 8°F difference. However, if you were to get a 50 watt tank heater with variable temperature controls, you would most likely be better off as you could set that heater to the low side of the power draw and have room to increase if the ambient temperature of your home gets colder.Using the Aquarium Guide below, find the size of your aquarium in the left hand column and move to the column that shows the number of degrees the aquarium needs to be heated. If the requirement is between levels, move up to the next larger size.Keep in mind that many heaters are specifically designed to heat only up to a certain high temperature. If you try and heat above the recommended high temperature setting, you may end up having to buy a new heater in short order. Heater failure, damage to the aquarium and injury to the fish its heating may occur if you don’t carefully follow the guidelines for the specific heater you are using. So, read the manufacturer’s boring directions thoroughly!In addition to the actual fish tank, a successful aquarium requires several elements, including a filtration system, lighting, a heater and substrate. This guide covers the basics to help you choose the right components and how to set up your first aquarium.