Hamster Cage - DIY aquarium conversion

DIY hamster cage. Made from large plastic bin. Much more affordable than a large aquarium!
Photo provided by Flickr
You could also buy a “topper” for the glass cage. The topper, made of wire, sits on top of the aquarium and lets you add additional levels that your hamster can climb up. With the topper, you have more chances to see your hamster climbing and playing.
Hamster Cage - DIY aquarium conversion
Photo provided by Flickr
Finally, if you put your aquarium in direct sunlight, the glass will increase the heat inside the cage. It can get hot enough to kill your hamster!
Hamster Cage - DIY aquarium conversion
Photo provided by FlickrSophie Little's hamster cage. DIY aquarium conversion.
Photo provided by FlickrHamster Cage - DIY aquarium conversion
Photo provided by Flickr
Myth 2: “Aquariums don’t have good ventilation.” In reality aquariums have great ventilation that is better than most (if not all) commercial hamster cages for sale in the U.S. The big danger with inadequate ventilation is that ammonia will build up which can cause respiratory problems. Luckily, ammonia is lighter than air so ammonia will rise to out the top of an aquarium. This actually makes aquariums much better ventilated than any cage with bunches of tubes and a plastic top! Overall, if you do the math aquariums have great ventilation for hamsters!Are you in need of a hamster cage? If you are going to acquire a pet hamster, you will need to get some sort of home as well. If you already have a decent sized aquarium, you can convert it into a hamster cage with minimal trouble. However, if you do this, you should be aware of how to do it properly, and the advantages and disadvantages that using an aquarium as a hamster cage can bring. What follows should help you convert your old aquarium into a cage for a hamster.Myth 3: “Hamsters need a barred cage to climb.” In reality hamsters are burrowing creatures that are quite frankly awful at climbing. I have seen many injuries from falls when hamsters climb their barred cages. Aquariums are also nice because their are no bars to chew which means no broken teeth or annoying noise!Clean out the cage thoroughly using a mixture of water and a small amount of bleach. You want to remove every trace of whatever animal lived in the aquarium previously, if any, and make sure that your hamster does not get any dirt or germs from the aquarium. Once it is clean, rinse the aquarium thoroughly and let it dry.In order to effectively turn an aquarium into a place that a hamster can live, you will need to use the correct materials. The aquarium you use should have at least 1 square foot of space, but more is always better. If your aquarium is smaller, you may be better off simply purchasing a cage at the pet store.Fortunately, Syrian hamsters’ teeth continuously grow throughout their life. However, a damaged tooth can make it difficult to eat. If your hamster has a broken tooth, take him to the vet immediately. Place many soft chew toys in their cage to encourage them to nibble on that instead of the bars. If they refuse to do so, you may have to migrate them to a cage without any bars such as an aquarium or bin cage.