Find the right aquarium ammonia remover for your tank

Fish & Aquarium Supplies: Biological Additives for Bio Filters to Remove Ammonia.
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Many studies have examined ammonia's conversion to nitrite, and many articles have been written for professional and hobby aquarists that detail various practical aspects of the process, such as how to set up appropriate filters to facilitate this process. Stephen Spotte covers these in great detail in two of his books.6,7 Many reef aquaria have no filters set up specifically for this purpose, and the bacteria that carry out this process reside in coatings on most surfaces in the aquarium, including rocks, sand, glass, plastic and even on the surfaces of other organisms, such as coralline algae.
There is no need to use ammonia for an aquarium. You can use Ammon carbonate (salts of hartshorn) or urea instead.
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The Freshwater Master Test Kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API) is a complete kit that tests the most important chemical levels in an quickly and easily. This test kit checks pH, high range pH, nitrite and nitrate, and ammonia levels. This kit includes enough product for more than 800 tests, and comes with an easy-to-read instruction booklet that includes information on how to correct any unsafe chemical
levels.
Ace ammonia? - Aquarium Advice - Aquarium Forum Community
Photo provided by FlickrAmmonia is also formed as uneaten feed or other organic matter in an aquarium decomposes
Photo provided by FlickrAmmonia Test Kits for Aquariums | That Fish Place - That Pet Place
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Like all living creatures, fish give off waste products (pee andpoo). These nitrogenous waste products break down into ammonia (NH3),which is highly toxic to most fishes. In nature, the volume of waterper fish is extremely high, and waste products become diluted to lowconcentrations. In aquariums, however, it can take as little as a fewhours for ammonia concentrations to reach toxic levels.I would encourage all fish keepers to gain an understanding of the nitrogen cycle as this will help you understand exactly what is going on inside your tank and how you can deal with water quality problems should they arise.The simple answer is yes, an aquarium must be cycled properly before you can safely add your fish. It doesn't matter whether the tank is 15 gallons or 500 gallons, it's still got to be cycled. If you were to simply fill your tank with water and then add all your fish at once then there would be such a massive buildup of ammonia, the chances are your fish would be dead within a few days.Traditionally, there are two ways to cycle a fish tank. Both methods will involve introducing ammonia into the tank which will be the food the bacteria need to survive. The most common method of cycling an aquarium is to use small community fish that produce the ammonia themselves. A kinder, more acceptable way to cycle a fish tank is to use a method called the "fishless" cycle. This also involves adding ammonia to the aquarium, but as a name suggests you do not use live fish. In this article, we are going to use fish as it's probably easier for a beginner to undertake, and we wouldn't be happy with youngsters handling pure ammonia as it can be dangerous. If you would prefer not to use live fish then read this article on how to carry out a fishless cycle.We would recommend that you use small community fish like the Barb. The Tiger and Cherry Barb are absolutely ideal as they are quite a hardy species of freshwater fish and unlike some more sensitive species, won't turn belly up as soon as they are exposed to ammonia. If you are cycling a very small tank less than 20 gallons then you are probably better off using much smaller fish like guppies or neon tetra. Your fish store should be able to give you advice based on what fish they sell.It's important not to add too many fish as this will create a large ammonia spike very quickly which will probably just kill the fish within a few days. For a 55 gallon tank, 10 barbs would be appropriate. For a 75 gallon tank, you could go up to 15, for 100 gallons plus, you're looking around 20 upwards.It's become quite popular to kick start the cycling process by seeding your new aquarium with biological media that already contains live nitrifying bacteria.The desired species of nitrifying bacteria are present everywhere(e.g., in the air). Therefore, once you have an ammonia source in yourtank, it's only a matter of time before the desired bacteria establisha colony in your filter bed. The most common way to do this is toplace one or two (emphasis on one or two) hardy andinexpensive fish in your aquarium. The fish waste contains theammonia on which the bacteria live. Don't overfeed them! More foodmeans more ammonia! Some suggested species include: common goldfish(for cold water tanks), zebra danios and barbs for warmer tanks, anddamselfishes in marine systems. Note: Do not use ``toughies'' or otherfeeder fishes. Although cheap, they are extremely unhealthy and usingthem may introduce unwanted diseases to your tank.Traditionally, there are two ways to cycle a fish tank. Both methods will involve introducing ammonia into the tank which will be the food the bacteria need to survive. The most common method of cycling an aquarium is to use small community fish that produce the ammonia themselves. A kinder, more acceptable way to cycle a fish tank is to use a method called the "fishless" cycle. This also involves adding ammonia to the aquarium, but as a name suggests you do not use live fish. In this article, we are going to use fish as it's probably easier for a beginner to undertake, and we wouldn't be happy with youngsters handling pure ammonia as it can be dangerous. If you would prefer not to use live fish then read this article on how to carry out a fishless cycle.