Raw Fish and Raw Salmon:YesAll others:No

All fish are cold-blooded animals that live in the water. They have backbones, fins, and gills.
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I had dinner with my wife. All fishes served here are farmed by the Kinki University Fisheries Laboratory and come with their diplomas! They also serve traditional dishes from Wakayama prefecture, where the fisheries laboratory is.
Synonyms: guinea-fowl pufferfish, white-spotted balloon, white-spotted puffer
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The time based fish seem to be really inconsistent or bugged. Some people get them without rhyme or reason but messing with the clock also usually works. Noted that about the notification fish though. A video of all of the fish in ninja fishing on all of the islands as of April 2nd.
Photo provided by FlickrA fish is a , an animal with a backbone, which has adapted to life in the water. All fish:
Photo provided by FlickrRaw Fish and Raw Salmon:YesAll others:No
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One reason fish are so diverse is that 70 percent of the planet is covered in water. The animals in this group live in a variety of habitats ranging from coral reefs and kelp forests to rivers, streams, and the open ocean. Another is that fish are very old on the evolutionary scale. According to fossil records, they have been on Earth for more than 500 million years! The total number of living fish species—about 32,000— is greater than the total of all other vertebrate species (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) combined.Fish are a class of aquatic vertebrates. The combination of gills, fins and the fact that they live only in the water make fish different from all other animals.One reason fish are so diverse is that 70 percent of the planet is covered in water. The animals in this group live in a variety of habitats ranging from coral reefs and kelp forests to rivers, streams, and the open ocean. Another is that fish are very old on the evolutionary scale. According to fossil records, they have been on Earth for more than 500 million years! The total number of living fish species—about 32,000— is greater than the total of all other vertebrate species (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) combined.SUMMERS: [LAUGHS] I'm doing it because I have a deep fascination with fishes. I mean, a fascination with fishes that started when I was probably two or three years old and proceeded through the sort of fish tanks and fishing and building fly rods and tying flies to giant nets and big tanks and basically devoting my life to doing research on them. And I find their skeletons endlessly fascinating, I mean, just full of fabulous data that I can extract for all sorts of purposes.CURWOOD: It’s Living on Earth, I’m Steve Curwood. Some people think big, really big, and that's certainly true of University of Washington biology professor Adam Summers. Often called "the fish guy", Professor Summers wants to make CAT scans of every species of fish on Earth. He also advised the Pixar company on how fish move for the films, "Finding Nemo" and "Finding Dory". To find out how he expects to achieve his hugely ambitious goal we called him up at his lab on San Juan Island off Seattle, Washington. Adam Summers, welcome to Living on Earth.The series is about more than just the search for Tiktaalik: parts 2 and 3 are titled Your Inner Reptile and Your Inner Monkey. Just as part 1 illustrates the legacy we still carry from our fishlike ancestors, the second and third installments reveal what we inherited from reptiles (our skin, teeth and ears in particular) and what we got from ancestral primates (hands, vision, brains, along with some less desirable traits such as weak backs and a poor sense of smell).