Semi Aggressive Freshwater Fish Tropical Fish With Flair

Rainbow Shark - (AKA Epalzeorhynchos frenatus) - semi-aggressive tropical freshwater fish species.
Photo provided by Flickr
Tetras are freshwater tropical fish. More than likely, an aquarist has housed a tetra in his or her tank. Tetra fish are diverse. The more common species are the neon tetras and the cardinal tetras though there are many more. Tetras are a schooling fish. The neon tetra is not aggressive. They are very small…
Semi-Aggressive Freshwater Fish for a Tropical Aquarium
Photo provided by Flickr
Tetras are freshwater tropical fish. More than likely, an aquarist has housed a tetra in his or her tank. Tetra fish are diverse. The more common species are the neon tetras and the cardinal tetras though there are many more. Tetras are a schooling fish. The neon tetra is not aggressive. They are very small… Semi-Aggressive Freshwater Fish for a Tropical Aquarium
Photo provided by FlickrSemi-Aggressive Freshwater Fish for a Tropical Aquarium
Photo provided by FlickrSemi-Aggressive Freshwater Fish for a Tropical Aquarium
Photo provided by Flickr
If you’re thinking about adding semi-aggressive freshwater fish to your tropical aquarium take a moment to read through this list of suggestions.If you’re thinking about adding semi-aggressive freshwater fish to your tropical aquarium take a moment to read through this list of suggestions.The freshwater Angelfish is a very popular tropical fish because of its unique shape and because of their interesting personalities. Freshwater angelfish are aggressive eaters and will go to the top of the tank when they see you approach. Because of their aggressive feeding habits, make sure that your less aggressive fish are getting their share around feeding time.Aggression problems within schools can be fixed by adding further specimens. In the case of tiger barbs for example, fin-nipping amongst themselves and toward other tropical fish in the freshwater aquarium are most common when they’re kept in groups smaller than 10. Sex ratios are important too, and among species like mollies where aggression between males is common, it’s important to have at least twice as many females than males. In extreme cases, if a schooling species isn’t kept in adequate numbers, the dominant fish ends up harassing or killing all its companions; piranhas are notorious for this, but it can happen with tropical fish such as and Chromis too.Threat displays are meant to give the interloper a moment to decide whether to stay and fight or swim away to safety. But in a freshwater aquarium, space may be so limited that the interloper cannot leave the aggressor’s territory. The aggressor responds to this as if challenged, and begins chasing or attacking the interloper. If the aggressor is the stronger tropical fish, the interloper will often end up hiding at the top of the fish aquarium or behind the filter, as far away from the aggressor as it can get, breathing heavily, and displaying muted or dark colors (often resembling those of juvenile or female fish).You may have seen tropical fish labeled as semi-aggressive and wondered if they were smart choices for your freshwater aquarium. This label can be confusing, and not all fish earn it for the same reason.