African Tiger Fish (Hydrocynus) ID and Care Guide 2.3

Posted in: african tigerfish, goliath tigerfish, tiger fish care, tiger fish tankmates, ..
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One look at those teeth lets you know that the African Tiger Fish is a voracious predator. They are related to the Piranha, but get much larger. They can use those huge teeth to chop large fish into bite sized pieces. The size alone limits who will able to keep one as they would need an aquarium of 650 gallons and upwards of a 1000 gallons or more. This fish is best suited for a public aquarium or for the most experienced fish keepers with the space and financial ability to care for these giants. The African Tigerfish is not actually hard to care for as far as getting the water right, nor getting them to eat. They just get real big and eat a lot.

There is a sticky at the top of this sub forum called: African tiger fish ID and care..
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Please keep all comments constructive to African tiger fish husbandry methods and care. Any degrading, sarcastic, or disrespectful comments will be removed. How do you care for an African Tiger Fish?
Photo provided by FlickrGoliath Tigerfish - Hydrocynus goliath · African TigerFish CareFreshwater FishTropical FishAfricansTigersPrehistoric
Photo provided by FlickrJan 25, 2006 - African tiger fish Care Sheet - Care, Diet, Housing Enclosures, Sexing, Lighting, Temperatures, Vitamin and Calcium Supplements.
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Africans would be my first choice... another option would be a silver baracuda. Be careful that the fish isn't mislabeled... they are commonly mismarked in pet stores. I will do some research over the weekend and try to get more details to help you determine proper species ID. With the baracuda, you can still see the teeth, they don't get as large (about 10-12 inches) and can be kept in a 75 gallon long term, especially if only 1 is kept in there. You'll get the same "look" as with the tiger fish, but something more suited to an aquarium.African Tiger Fish are large predacious fish. They are undemanding of water quality and eat readily, but their size alone limits who will able to keep them. When small, these fish will seem like an interesting and exotic addition to your tank. But they grow to an alarming size and have amazing bursts of speed, both of which make providing a suitable environment over the course of their lifespan very challenging.Small juveniles may initially be kept in a large home aquarium, but eventually they will need a very large tank. In their adult size, they are really best suited for public aquariums, or kept by experienced fish keepers with the space and financial ability to care for these giants.The African Tigerfish is not actually hard to care for in terms of water quality or food variety, but they get really big and eat a lot. The large size alone limits the type of aquarist who will able to keep one. When first purchased as small juveniles, they may initially be kept in a large home aquarium. But eventually, full-sized adults will need a very large tank. An aquarium of 650 gallons, even upwards of a 1000 gallons or more, will be needed to keep them happy and healthy. In its adult size, this giant fish is really best suited for public aquariums or for highly experienced aquarists with the space and financial ability to properly care for them.Like most giant fish, the biggest concern with the African Tiger Fish is lack of space and food. If you can meet these needs, not much goes wrong with these giants. These fish are hardy and disease is not usually a problem in a well-maintained aquarium. However, aquarists still need to take precautions against health problems and disease. Anything you add to your tank can introduce disease. Not only other fish but plants, substrate, and decorations can harbor bacteria. Take great care and make sure to properly clean or quarantine anything you add to an established tank so as not to upset the balance. Because these fish eat live food, disease can be passed to them from their foods. Make sure to quarantine live food before feeding.A good thing about the African Tiger Fish is their resilience. An outbreak of disease can often be limited to just one or a few fishes if dealt with it at an early stage. When keeping more sensitive types of fish, it is common for all fishes to be infected even before the first warning signs can be noticed. The best way to proactively prevent disease is to give your fish the proper environment and a well balanced diet. The more closely their environment resembles their natural habitat, the less stress the fish will have and the healthier and happier they will be. A stressed fish is more likely to acquire disease.As with most fish, the African Tiger Fish is prone to skin flukes, parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.), ichthyobodo infection, parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.), bacterial infections (general), and bacterial disease. Aquarists should read up on the common tank diseases. Knowing the signs and catching and treating them early makes a huge difference. For information about freshwater fish diseases and illnesses, see .